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At 75, Frank Williams is retired from his position as the groundskeeper for the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia. But he still works there three days a week and he hasn't slowed down a bit. CAES News
Williams Honored
After more than 30 years, Frank Williams has retired from his position as the groundskeeper for the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden (CGBG) at the Historic Bamboo Farm, but he still works there three days a week. Even at 75, he hasn’t slowed down.
Millipedes are often called “thousand-legged worms.” They don't carry diseases that affect people, animals or plants, but some species are capable of secreting chemicals that can irritate the skin and eyes and cause allergic reactions. CAES News
Creepy Crawlers
Millipedes and centipedes often come indoors and strike fear in homeowners. Millipedes aren’t poisonous, but some species can secrete chemicals that can irritate the skin and eyes and cause allergic reactions. Centipedes seldom bite, but their jaws contain poison glands.
Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky,' have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators. CAES News
Bee Watching
Move over bird-watchers! Backyard insect-watching has become a popular pastime thanks to the public’s increased interest in pollinator health and habitats. Learning about the types of the bees and the wing colors of migrating butterflies can enrich the pollinator experience in the home garden.
A diseased leaf on a tree at the University of Georgia's Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Ga. CAES News
Turf & Ornamentals
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day is set for Thursday, Aug. 9, on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. This year, two optional, interactive sessions especially designed for landscape experts will follow the field day.
University of Georgia blueberry scientist Scott NeSmith has to keep birds away from his blueberry crop so that he can research and breed new varieties for Georgia growers. His latest trick — using a dancing, inflatable tube man to scare the birds — may lead passersby to believe that the UGA Griffin campus is selling cars. CAES News
Wacky Scarecrow
Farmers have used scarecrows to keep birds away from field crops for more than 3,000 years. University of Georgia blueberry scientist Scott NeSmith uses a dancing, inflatable tube man to scare the birds away from his research plants.
Founding members of the National Initiative for Consumer Horticulture include (l-r) Suzi McCoy (Garden Media Group), Ellen Bauske (University of Georgia), Gail Langellotto (Oregon State University) Tom Bewick (USDA-NIFA), Casey Scale (American Public Gardens Association) Pam Bennett (The Ohio State University), Julie Weisenhorn (Minnesota State University) and Debbie Hamrick (North Carolina Farm Bureau Federation). CAES News
NICH Meeting
A new national initiative encourages consumers to add plants to their homes and landscapes for the health benefits plants provide.
Events, like this Halloween celebration at the Healthy Life Community Garden in Griffin, Georgia, bring the public into community gardens. To help ensure a garden's long lifespan, it must be visible to people outside the group of garden supporters, says University of Georgia community garden expert Becky Griffin. CAES News
Garden Promotion
A community garden is much more than raised beds and vegetables. The garden builds a sense of community. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers tips to help your garden reach its full potential.
Poison ivy grows up a tree in Jackson, Ga. CAES News
Poison Ivy
Poison ivy is one of gardeners’ most dreaded landscape weeds, and it is growing and thriving now. If you have ever experienced the red, itchy, blistery rash that comes from being in contact with this weed, then you understand gardeners’ disdain for this plant. 
Beekeeper and bees at the UGA Bee Laboratory on the university's Horticulture Research Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Honeybee 101
There are many bee look-alikes in the insect world. One way to distinguish a bee from other insects is to learn some bee biology.
Ideally, grass clippings should be recycled into the grass. If a large amount of clippings remain, bagging is the best option. CAES News
Messy Lawns
After weeks of rainfall, lawns grew and now mowing may leave a significant volume of clippings behind. If there's too much to rake into the canopy, the clippings should be removed.