Browse Controlling and Preventing Disease Stories

38 results found for Controlling and Preventing Disease
Washing face coverings is an important part of preventing "maskne," or face acne caused by wearing masks. CAES News
Washing face coverings is an important part of preventing "maskne," or face acne caused by wearing masks.
Avoiding Maskne
Adding to the other little irritations caused by wearing masks — slippage, missed cues, muffled sound — masks can also cause skin irritation, so it’s important to know how to care for your mask as well as your skin.
An increasing number of COVID-19 patients have reported losses of smell and/or taste, prompting the CDC to add it to the growing list of symptoms for COVID-19. The arrow in the photo points to a taste bud (red) with a taste "pore," a channel opening that communicates with the oral cavity. CAES News
An increasing number of COVID-19 patients have reported losses of smell and/or taste, prompting the CDC to add it to the growing list of symptoms for COVID-19. The arrow in the photo points to a taste bud (red) with a taste "pore," a channel opening that communicates with the oral cavity.
COVID-19 Cell Immunity
A new study from the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia is the first to suggest that COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells.
As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Malak Esseili has been focused on studying the microbial ecology of human viral pathogens (such as human noroviruses), and now her work includes the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). CAES News
As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Malak Esseili has been focused on studying the microbial ecology of human viral pathogens (such as human noroviruses), and now her work includes the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
Coronavirus Research
When COVID-19 was identified, Malak Esseili stopped taking her children along on trips to the grocery store and she told her sisters to start wearing scarves as makeshift masks while in public. As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Esseili studied the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
Dr. John Peroni at an RBC research roundtable meeting. At the table, left to right, Hitesh Handa, Peroni, Lohitash Karumbaiah and Jason Locklin. (Submitted photo taken in 2018) CAES News
Dr. John Peroni at an RBC research roundtable meeting. At the table, left to right, Hitesh Handa, Peroni, Lohitash Karumbaiah and Jason Locklin. (Submitted photo taken in 2018)
Lymph System
A team including University of Georgia researchers has for the first time documented the regrowth of surgically removed pathways in the lymphatic system, a network of vessels designed to pump away inflammatory fluids and defend the body against infection.
A student working on the UGA Tifton Campus weighs tomatoes at the Blackshank Farm. CAES News
A student working on the UGA Tifton Campus weighs tomatoes at the Blackshank Farm.
COVID-10 Ag Safety
Farmers and food processors take routine steps to reduce the likelihood of foodborne pathogens, like Salmonella and E. coli, contacting our food and causing illness. The procedures that our food industry takes on a daily basis are also effective in reducing the chances that the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 will come in contact with the food we eat.
Illustration by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which has been named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). CAES News
Illustration by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which has been named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
COVID-19 Resources
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, in cooperation with North Carolina State University and other land grant universities, compiled a list of resources to assist the general public, farmers and the food industry during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Left, imaging of healthy neurons from mouse brain. Right, imaging of damaged neurons by PD protein clumps. CAES News
Left, imaging of healthy neurons from mouse brain. Right, imaging of damaged neurons by PD protein clumps.
‘Natural killer’ cells could halt Parkinson’s progression
Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and their colleagues have found that “natural killer” white blood cells could guard against the cascade of cellular changes that lead to Parkinson’s disease and help stop its progression.
Samantha Spellicy, a graduate student of the Stice lab at the University of Georgia, performs a lab test on the therapeutic activity of exosomes. CAES News
Samantha Spellicy, a graduate student of the Stice lab at the University of Georgia, performs a lab test on the therapeutic activity of exosomes.
Stroke Recovery
University of Georgia animal scientists, funded by the National Institutes of Health, have brain-imaging data for a new stroke treatment that supports full recovery in swine, modeled with the same pattern of neurodegeneration as seen in humans with severe stroke.
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology. With this potential new technique, RBC researchers, including Steve Stice (left) and Lohitash Karumbaiah (right), hope to boost the brain’s natural ability to recover and provide physicians with a treatment that can be administered immediately in cases of severe TBI. CAES News
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology. With this potential new technique, RBC researchers, including Steve Stice (left) and Lohitash Karumbaiah (right), hope to boost the brain’s natural ability to recover and provide physicians with a treatment that can be administered immediately in cases of severe TBI.
“Cargo” Molecules
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes — “cargo” molecules within the nervous system that carry messages to the brain — can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology.
Created by the University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) team, Food eTalk and Food Talk: Better U are now included in the United States Department of Agriculture SNAP-Ed Toolkit. The collection of evidence-based interventions is designed to improve the lives of SNAP-eligible participants by encouraging healthy food and lifestyle choices that prevent obesity. CAES News
Created by the University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) team, Food eTalk and Food Talk: Better U are now included in the United States Department of Agriculture SNAP-Ed Toolkit. The collection of evidence-based interventions is designed to improve the lives of SNAP-eligible participants by encouraging healthy food and lifestyle choices that prevent obesity.
SNAP-ED Toolkit
Two interventions created by the University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) team have been added to the national SNAP-Ed Toolkit.