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‘Orange Bulldog’ is an improved pumpkin variety developed by UGA scientists from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America. It has greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. ‘Orange Bulldog’ made its debut in 2004 and has consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pounds per acre in north and south Georgia. CAES News
‘Orange Bulldog’ is an improved pumpkin variety developed by UGA scientists from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America. It has greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. ‘Orange Bulldog’ made its debut in 2004 and has consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pounds per acre in north and south Georgia.
Pumpkin Pointers
Georgia farmers devote about 900 acres to growing pumpkins — technically a squash and a cousin to the cucumber. Most Georgia-grown pumpkins come from the northernmost part of the state where the climate is cooler and there is less disease pressure. UGA-bred ‘Orange Bulldog' is disease resistant.
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well.
Produce Safety Grants
Three University of Georgia food scientists are among the recipients of grants awarded by the Center for Produce Safety (CPS) as part of its $2.7 million program. The grants will fund projects focused on food safety issues related to fruits and vegetables. 
Created by the University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) team, Food eTalk and Food Talk: Better U are now included in the United States Department of Agriculture SNAP-Ed Toolkit. The collection of evidence-based interventions is designed to improve the lives of SNAP-eligible participants by encouraging healthy food and lifestyle choices that prevent obesity. CAES News
Created by the University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) team, Food eTalk and Food Talk: Better U are now included in the United States Department of Agriculture SNAP-Ed Toolkit. The collection of evidence-based interventions is designed to improve the lives of SNAP-eligible participants by encouraging healthy food and lifestyle choices that prevent obesity.
SNAP-ED Toolkit
Two interventions created by the University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) team have been added to the national SNAP-Ed Toolkit.
The only way to properly remove and kill bacteria from raw poultry meat is to thoroughly cook the poultry to a minimum of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. A USDA report now shows that even if consumers don't wash raw poultry, the food safety risk is still present due to other common habits. CAES News
The only way to properly remove and kill bacteria from raw poultry meat is to thoroughly cook the poultry to a minimum of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. A USDA report now shows that even if consumers don't wash raw poultry, the food safety risk is still present due to other common habits.
Cooking Chicken Safely
Food safety experts have been warning consumers against washing and rinsing raw poultry for many years, citing how the bacteria in poultry juices can spread and cross contaminate other foods, utensils and surfaces. A USDA report shows that many aren't listening.
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat (right) and UGA Professor Francisco Diez were recognized by the International Association for Food Protection at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky. CAES News
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat (right) and UGA Professor Francisco Diez were recognized by the International Association for Food Protection at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky.
IAFP Honors
Two University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences food scientists have been presented awards of excellence from the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP). Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat and Professor Francisco Diez were recognized at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24 in Louisville, Kentucky.
An increase in illnesses that trace back to wheat products has prompted scientists in the UGA Center for Food Safety to search for ways to eliminate pathogens in raw wheat without affecting the quality or taste of the staple food. In wheat-related cases, cookie dough, cake batter and raw wheat flour are common carriers of foodborne pathogens. CAES News
An increase in illnesses that trace back to wheat products has prompted scientists in the UGA Center for Food Safety to search for ways to eliminate pathogens in raw wheat without affecting the quality or taste of the staple food. In wheat-related cases, cookie dough, cake batter and raw wheat flour are common carriers of foodborne pathogens.
Wheat Outbreaks
Consumers have long been warned against the hazards of eating raw cookie dough. As more cases of foodborne illness are linked to contaminated wheat flour, University of Georgia food safety experts are touting the risk in a louder, more forceful voice, while searching for ways to eliminate foodborne pathogens on wheat products.
Three frozen blackberry, raspberry and blueberry products have been recalled from Kroger because of a potential hepatitis A health risk. Consumers are urged to check their freezers for the items. The hepatitis A virus can cause a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months. CAES News
Three frozen blackberry, raspberry and blueberry products have been recalled from Kroger because of a potential hepatitis A health risk. Consumers are urged to check their freezers for the items. The hepatitis A virus can cause a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months.
Hep A Threat
Kroger stores in Georgia and across the nation have recalled three frozen berry products because of a possible health risk of hepatitis A. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension urges consumers to take this recall seriously, as the virus can cause serious health issues.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer.
Freezing Onions
Georgia-grown Vidalia onions have hit the grocery and farmers market shelves. Farmers have been careful to handle the crop with kid gloves during the harvest. Now, consumers have to make sure to store them properly for long-term use.
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers. CAES News
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers.
Food Waste
Most Americans buy food knowing that they will likely throw some of it away. And, as incomes rise, so does the amount of food that’s wasted. These are just a few of the findings revealed by a food waste study conducted by University of Georgia economists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Cartons of eggs at a UGA research facility. CAES News
Cartons of eggs at a UGA research facility.
Easter Food Safety
Easter is right around the corner, and while this holiday can mean different things to different people, many celebrate it with egg dyeing, Easter egg hunts and family meals. That means food safety needs to be part of these springtime traditions too.