Publications

UGA Extension publications offer free, research-based information to Georgians on a variety of topics including agriculture, the environment, families, food, lawn and garden, and youth. The publications below are based on agricultural and applied economics related topics.

Cotton Payments, Disaster Assistance, and Safety Net Update -  This factsheet discusses the Market Facilitation Program, the legislative process related to disaster assistance, seed cotton program updates in the 2018 Farm Bill, choices between ARC/PLC enrollment, and STAX for the seed cotton program. (Don Shurley and Yangxuan Liu, March 2019)

First Look at the Farm Bill Title I for Row Crops: Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018. - The 2018 Farm Bill continues programs for Title I commodities from the 2014 Farm Bill: the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) program, the Price Loss Coverage (PLC) program, and the Marketing Assistance Loans (MAL) program with Loan Deficiency Payments (LDP). This factsheet identifies some major changes in the new farm bill.  (Yangxuan Liu and Adam Rabinowitz, December 2018)

Implications of Hurricane Michael on the Seed Cotton ARC  - With the hurricane causing tremendous damages to our cotton industry, a lot of counties suffer from tremendous yield losses. This factsheet compares between the Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) for this year after Hurricane Michael. We conducted the analysis based on some representative counties in GA. (Yangxuan Liu, October 2018)

What Farmers Need to Know about Crop Insurance and Prevented Planting - Southern Georgia has seen a lot of rain during the month of May. This publication discusses important details about crop insurance and prevented planting claims. There are some frequently asked questions, answers, and links to additional resources. (Rabinowitz, May 2018)

How Generic Base Could Be Treated in the Cottonseed Proposal - One proposal sought by cotton industry leadership to improve cotton’s “safety net” has been to make cottonseed a covered commodity and eligible for PLC as an “Other Oilseed” under the current 2014 farm bill. (Shurley, August 2017)

Recent Cotton Policy Developments - Under the 2014 farm bill, cotton is not a “covered commodity” and not eligible for the ARC and PLC programs. One of the things that the 2014 farm bill did do was to convert the cotton base on a farm to Generic Base. The current farm bill is now in its 4th year and will expire with the 2018 crop year unless extended. (Shurley, July 2017)

Estimated ARC and PLC Payments for 2016 Covered Commodities - The 2014 farm bill eliminated the DCP (Direct and Countercyclical Payment) Program of the 2002 and 2008 farm bills. In the 2014 farm bill, DCP was replaced by ARC (Agricultural Risk Coverage) and PLC (Price Loss Coverage). Read more about the estimated ARC and PLC payments for covered commodities in 2016. (Don Shurley and Adam N. Rabinowitz, July 2017)

Economic Impact of the Georgia Green Industry - The Georgia Green Industry consists of wholesale nursery, greenhouse, turfgrass sod producers, landscape design, construction/maintenance firms and wholesale and retail distribution firms (e.g., garden centers, home stores, mass merchandisers with lawn/garden departments, brokers/rewholesale distribution centers, and allied trade suppliers). (Hodges et al., 2015)

 

 

 

 

 


Recent Extension Publications on Field Crops
Sod Webworms: Biology and Management in Turfgrass
(C 1156)
Sod webworms are a serious pest of turfgrass in Georgia. There is limited information available to the green industry and the public about the general biology, ecology, and management of this pest. This publication includes photos of sod webworms, their life cycle, and management options so that landscape industry professionals and homeowners can learn about the pest sufficiently to manage it.
Preparing and Calibrating a No-Till or Conventional Drill for Establishing Forage or Cover Crops
(B 1510)
Properly maintaining, calibrating, and adjusting a seed drill before planting is an important part of ensuring the successful establishment of forage or cover crops. Seed may be placed at a depth that is too deep or too shallow if the equipment is not properly prepared and set. Too much or too little seed may be planted if the equipment is not properly calibrated. These planting mistakes may result in a poor stand, greater weed competition, lower yields, and/or reductions in forage quality. Conversely, planting more seed than required can unnecessarily increase establishment costs and can sometimes result in reduced yields. After investing in the seed and committing the time to plant a field, taking a few extra steps to ensure that investment bears fruit is well worth maintaining, calibrating, and adjusting the drill.
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